Joseph Pearce

Joseph Pearce is Visiting Professor of Literature at Ave Maria University and a Visiting Fellow of Thomas More College of Liberal Arts (Merrimack, New Hampshire). The author of over thirty books, he is editor of the St. Austin Review, series editor of the Ignatius Critical Editions, senior instructor with Homeschool Connections, and senior contributor at the Imaginative Conservative and Crisis Magazine. His personal website is http://www.jpearce.co.

recent articles

Hilaire Belloc Revisited

Trying to encapsulate the scope of Hilaire Belloc’s achievement in a brief essay is akin to trying to capture the immensity of the seas that he sailed in the finiteness of the flagons from which he imbibed.

The Challenge of Charity

As a young man, I was consumed by anger at the state of the world and hated those I thought responsible. Save me, Lord, from falling into that trap today regarding the Church.

Father Elijah in a Nutshell

One of the particular strengths of Father Elijah is the way in which O’Brien brings his eponymous hero to fully-fledged and fully-fleshed life.

Declare in a Nutshell

Tim Powers, the author of “Declare,” stands out from the crowd of contemporary novelists because he is a faithful Catholic who has somehow managed to swim in the toxic mainstream without compromising his faith or principles.

Vinland in a Nutshell

Some authors and some books are not as well-known as they should be. This is indubitably the case with George Mackay Brown and his tour de force of a novel: Vinland.

The Violent Bear It Away in a Nutshell

Flannery O’Conner’s modus operandi as a writer was the employment of violence and the grotesque to shock her readers out of their somnambulant indifference to truth.

Till We Have Faces

Till We Have Faces in a Nutshell

C.S. Lewis called Till We Have Faces “my best book” and “far and away the best I have written.” He said it was the “favourite of all my books.”

The Hobbit in a Nutshell

At its deepest level, The Hobbit can be seen as a parabolic commentary on the words from St. Matthew’s Gospel that where our treasure is, there our heart will be also.

C in a Nutshell

“C” by Maurice Baring is little known, but received the highest of praise from the French novelist André Maurois, who wrote that no book had given him such pleasure since his reading of Tolstoy, Proust, and certain novels by E.M. Forster.

The Ball and the Cross in a Nutshell

The overarching spirit of “The Ball and the Cross” can be encapsulated in a comment that Chesterton made of his relationship with his brother: we were always arguing, but we never quarreled.

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